3 Centers the Chicago Bears Should Pursue in Free Agency

The Chicago Bears need to upgrade at center on the offensive line. Here are three players they should try to sign in free agency.

Denny Medley-USA TODAY Sports
facebooktwitterreddit
Prev
2 of 3
Next

Evan Brown

Brown makes the most sense since he started 16 games at center for new offensive coordinator Shane Waldron while they were both together in Seattle last season.

Brown was an undrafted free agent who bounced between the New York Giants, the Miami Dolphins, and the Cleveland Browns during his first two NFL seasons before finally catching on with the Detroit Lions.

He started 24 games splitting time between guard and center for the Lions during his two-and-half seasons there. Brown then signed with the Seahawks last season.

Brown finished with a 55.5 overall rating according to PFF. He gave up just three sacks in 955 snaps last season but did commit seven penalties.

The risk is that Brown could just be history repeating itself like when the Bears signed Lucas Patrick two years ago because he was familiar with former offensive coordinator Luke Getsy's scheme due to their time together in Green Bay.

Brown's rating is better than Patrick's 50.5 and Brown committed four fewer penalties than Lucas, who led the league at center according to PFF.

The concern with Brown is the Seahawks' line struggled last season. Seattle also had injuries to deal with on the offensive line. It seems the guards were a problem and not Brown.

Brown is 27, so he still has youth on his side that the Bears like. His experience with Waldron's offense would be valuable to help Williams if the Bears choose to draft him. Rookie quarterbacks all struggle with understanding protection assignments. Brown would be valuable there in helping Williams grow in that area.

He feels like a prime free agent to sign while the Bears double-dip at upgrading the position by drafting a center too. That rookie center could sit behind Brown much like the legendary Olin Kreutz did behind Casey Wiegmann in 1998.